Posts tagged: Sarah

Popmatic Podcast for March 30, 2016: Woo! College!

By , March 30, 2016


I Am Charlotte Simmons by Tom WolfeMarch Madness is reaching peak hysteria. The more bookish among us know basketball teams often have colleges attached to them so on this show—college! Sarah joins us. I don’t think she mentions Butler once. Part of me admires her restraint. Another part of me fears she has been traumatized by their recent loss. Somehow a fruit themed pun contest breaks out. All this and more on this week’s episode of the Popmatic Podcast.

WOO! COLLEGE!

I Am Charlotte Simmons by Tom Wolfe

Art School Confidential DVD | Hoopla

Art School Confidential: A Screenplay by Daniel Clowes

The Dyer Observatory

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss print | ebook | audio

Donnie Darko

“The Killing Moon” from Songs to Learn and Sing by Echo & the Bunnymen CD | Hoopla

Nashville College for Young Ladies 1899 Basket Ball Team (yes, that’s two words)
Nashville College for Young Ladies Basket Ball Team 1899

For more of the Nashville College for Young Ladies check out Sarah’s awesome post or visit the Metro Archives in person

TICKLING OUR FANCY

The Mercy of the Sky by Holly Bailey

Chattanooga Film Festival

Better Nature by Silver Sun Pickups

The Belt by In the Valley Below

Rom Spaceknight

R.I.P. Phife Dawg

Alien: Isolation

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Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

Wilson Collection pays tribute…

By , January 25, 2016

David Bowie

Recently Updated!

I think it’s safe to say that the year 2016 is starting off a little more bitter than sweet. Not only has the winter weather showed up with a vengeance, but there have been several shocking and heartbreaking deaths already this new year. Though this tribute is predominately focusing on David Bowie and his love for reading, I’d like to first recognize a few other individuals who also recently passed away.

The most recent passing being of the great, English actor Alan Rickman, who passed away last Thursday (the 14th) of Pancreatic Cancer. Though my favorite role he played will Always be Severus Snape in theAlan Rickman Harry Potter films, he was famous for many of his other films including Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, Love Actuallyand of course, Die Hard. No one will ever forget his voice either.

On a more personal note, this next individual that passed away on Jan. 12th is being mentioned because his death was felt by everyone in the Butler Bulldog community – a community I am very much a part of as a proud alumna. At the young age of 25, former Butler basketball player Andrew Smith passed away after 2 tough years battling Cancer.

I could go on about the tough fight Andrew put up, how strong his wife was throughout the battle (and how strong she still is), and what he means to the school, but you’d be reading forever, and as Brad Stevens (former Butler coach-turned Celtics coach) said “it still wouldn’t do him justice.” But I’ll simply say that my thoughts go out to his family and friends, and summarize his character with a message sent out from the school – “He is, was, and always will be a Bulldog.

Andrew SmithSorry to take it down a notch, but like all lives, these are worth mentioning and remembering.

For the last tribute, I’m going to recognize innovative English musician, David Bowie. Bowie passed away on January 10th, just 2 days after his birthday and the release of his latest album, Blackstar.

As sad as I am at his passing like many others, I will halt here on my tribute to Bowie because if you are a regular follower of the Library’s Off-the-Shelf blog, you have already seen the beautiful tribute written by Bryan on January 11th. If not, click here to check it out. Instead, I’d like to share a few of Bowie’s favorite books via the Wilson Collection.

David BowieLike music and art, Bowie enjoyed immersing himself in a book; it was one of his favorite forms of relaxation. When he toured or was filming a movie, he had a large collection of books with him always. And, he was also one of the first celebrities to pose for the American Library Association’s series of READ posters. For the 1987 edition, you can find Bowie jumping for joy (it appears) while he reads Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Idiot. 

If you haven’t already seen the many shared articles and Twitter feeds, a list of Bowie’s top 100 favorite books was released (unsure of when and by whom initially). Though I wish we had every single one of them in the Wilson Collection, I was at least happy to find a few.

 

 

Here are 3 of his favorites:

Madame BovaryMadame Bovary
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Water-Color Illustrations by: Gunter Böhmer
LEC: 1938

  • This is a tragic story about Emma Bovary, the wife of a doctor, who indulges in adulterous behavior to escape her provincial life. I say “tragic” because the story ends with Emma taking her own life due to unhappiness.
  • This book is not only considered to be a masterpiece, but is also a seminal work of literary realism. It received strong backlash when it was first published due to its controversial content.
  • This copy of the book is signed by well-known German-Swiss illustrator, Gunter Böhmer. Though he was also known as a talented painter and draftsman, he was best known for his stylistic book illustrations.

The BridgeThe Bridge
Author: Hart Crane
Photographs by: Richard Mead Benson
LEC: 1981

  • It is a long poem with varying scope and style and was written as an ode to the Brooklyn Bridge and New York City.
  • Though he traveled around to different cities while writing the poem, Crane also spent time in an apartment that overlooked the famed bridge. What Crane didn’t know when he was living there was that the designer of the bridge also stayed there during the bridge’s construction.
  • The photographs taken for the LEC copy were by talented photographer, Richard Mead Benson – a longtime admirer of New York’s geographical beauty.

The LeopardThe Leopard
Author: Giuseppe di Lampedusa
32 Photographs from the film by: Giovan Battista Poletto
Arion Press: 2015

  • The story is based on the life of the author’s grandfather, Giulio Fabrizio Tomasi, who was Prince of Lampedusa. It follows the life of a family during the Italian Risorgimento, or Resurgence.
  • Published posthumously after several failed attempts, The Leopard eventually became the top-selling novel in Italian history after initial political attacks, and is now also considered to be one of the most important literary works in the modern Italian literature.
  • The book was also made into a film, the same film that the 32 photographs were taken from.

If you’re interested in visiting the Wilson Collection, you’ll find it on the 3rd floor of the Downtown Library in the East Reading Room (between the Fine Arts department and Non-Fiction). The hours are the same as the Main Library hours. If you’d like a personal tour of the collection where you’d get to see the books up close and even get to look through them yourself, either respond to this blog post or call either of the following numbers:

(615)880-2356 – leave a message for Liz.

 

Holiday Treats from the Wilson Collection Suite

By , December 28, 2015
Christmas cards from George W. Bush (from Archives) and the Wilson Limited Editions Collection. Christmas Card display can be found in Non-Fiction on 3rd floor of the Main Library.

Christmas cards from George W. Bush (from Archives) and the Wilson Limited Editions Collection. Christmas Card display can be found in Non-Fiction on 3rd floor of the Main Library.

Christmas doesn’t come from a store, maybe Christmas perhaps means a little bit more….

~ Dr. Seuss

Welcome back Wilson readers, and you know what time of year it is. The weather should give an indication but it hasn’t quite caught up with the times though; give it time, it will. If you haven’t caught up as well, it’s the holiday season of course and of all sorts – Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, New Year’s, you name it. In honor of this magical season, I’m going to highlight one of the Wilson Collection’s coolest additions and talk about the fun and easy craft we did during the Throwback Thursday program in Teens.

Let’s get started, shall we….

The Wilson Limited Editions Collection includes 2 copies of Dickens’ holiday classic, A Christmas CarolThe first was published by the Limited Editions Club in 1934, illustrated by artist, Gordon Ross. The second book in the collection was printed by the Arion Press in 1993. While both books embody their own uniqueness and beauty, my personal favorite is the Arion Press edition.

Arion Press published their copy in 1993 to honor the 150th anniversary of its first publication (in 1843). The edition includes an introduction by Paul Davis, a Professor of English Literature at the University of New Mexico. Davis is also a Charles Dickens’ expert. His intro to the book provides a chronicle of the illustrated editions of A Christmas CarolIda Applebroog, a well-known American artist whose works can be found in several popular art museums, created 50 illustrations for the special edition classic. Applebroog created illustrations that pay homage to the earlier versions of the book while also applying her own style.

Along with the anniversary edition, the Press also issued an extra suite of 18 hand-colored prints by Applebroog. When the prints are stood up on their folding stands, it forms a tableau. This special edition was limited to 25 copies and sold with the book, which makes it even more special.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

The Tableau created by artist, Applebroog, for the Arion Press edition of The Christmas Carol

The Tableau created by artist, Ida Applebroog, for the Arion Press edition of A Christmas Carol.

A few of the illustrations included in the tableau.

A few of the prints included in the tableau.


During December’s Teen program, Throwback Thursday, I took 3 intriguing books from the Wilson Collection:

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
Artist: Ida Applebroog
Arion Press, 1993

A Christmas Carol, published by the Arion Press.

A Christmas Carol, published by the Arion Press.

The Winter’s Tale by William Shakespeare
Artist: Albert Rutherston
Limited Editions Club: 1940

Dec Craft 2015_4

The Winter’s Tale, published by the LEC.

Genesis, translated from the Hebrew by Robert Alter
Artist: Michael Mazur
Arion Press, 1996

Dec Craft 2015_5

Genesis, published by the Arion Press.

Christmas ornament made out of old Christmas cards

Christmas ornament made out of old Christmas cards

I also included a craft for the teens to make ornaments out of Christmas cards. This is an easy and fun craft, especially if you save your cards like I do. All you need to create the ornament is (for 1 ornament):

2-4 Christmas cards (depending on how large you draw your circles)
Ribbon, yarn, or cord (about 1 ft long total)
Scissors
Glue
Pen or pencil
Circular object like a bottle to draw circles

Step 1: On the back of the card fronts, trace 8 circles total (there is no definite size, I drew 1-inch circles and that’s approximately the size you see here).

Step 2: Cut out your circles.

Step 3: Fold each circle in half, creasing the fold well. Then, fold them in half again. They should look like the picture you see below.

Christmas Card Ornament

Step 4: Open each folded circle, cut along just one fold to the middle of the circle (only to the middle).

Step 5: This step can be tedious because you will have to do it to each circle, but it involves the use of the glue. With the circle facing you, place glue on the bottom right section of the circle. Bring the left side of the circle over the right now, and press down to the glue. Your circle should now look like a triangle. Now repeat this step until they are all triangles.

Step 6: This is another repetitive step – but take two triangles and glue them together. They should look like the picture below. Repeat 4 times until all triangles are glued to another.

Christmas Card ornament

Step 7: Now you should see where I am going with this, but let’s glue two of the sections together to create a half-circle.

Step 8: Before gluing the other half to each other, let’s first glue your ribbon or cord to the first half-circle. Glue it half-way down the half-circle for firm placement.

Step 9: Now you may glue the two halves together. Your final product can happily hang on your tree now very easily with it’s ribbon/cord/yarn!

Dec Craft 2015_2

The bottom ornament is the one created with recycled Christmas Cards.


Look forward to next month’s post that will include the schedule for our upcoming book-making workshop programs. I was going to post these programs this month, but it’s better to wait until the new year to finalize all details.

If you’re interested in visiting the Wilson Collection, you’ll find it on the 3rd floor of the Downtown Library in the East Reading Room (between the Fine Arts department and Non-Fiction). The hours are the same as the Main Library hours. If you’d like a personal tour of the collection where you’d get to see the books up close and even get to look through them yourself, either respond to this blog post or call either of the following numbers:

(615)880-2363 – leave a message for myself.

(615)880-2356 – leave a message for Liz.

Stay tuned for next month’s post!

Popmatic Podcast for December 9, 2015: Best Music of the Year

By , December 9, 2015


It’s the best music of the year! Luckily, Sarah and Jesse are here to ballast this nerd ship. Would Amanda of all people pick something the library doesn’t own? For shame. Plus what is tickling out fancy this week. If anyone wants a Spotify list, ask in the comments. You know what else to put in the comments? Your picks for the best music of the year!

BEST MUSIC WE HEARD THIS YEAR

Mike
1) “Cassette” by Viet Cong and their video for “Continental Shelf
2) The Deepest Lake by Dengue Fever
3) Heroes by Sabaton
 

Sarah
The Fool by Ryn Weaver1) The Fool by Ryn Weaver
2) Daybreaker by Moon Taxi CD | Freegal
3) Then Came the Morning by The Lone Bellow
 

Jesse
A Special Episode of Open Mike Eagle1) Beat Happening‘s catalog
2) A Special Episode by Open Mike Eagle
3) Natalie Prass by Natalie Prass
 

Amanda
Skrillex and Diplo present Jack U1) Jack Ü by Skrillex & Diplo
2) Capture the Sun by Blockhead
3) “Uptown Funk” by Mark Ronson
 

Bryan
Art Angels by Grimes1) Art Angels by Grimes
2) Mute Records’ catalog
3) Over the Edge Radio
 

TICKLING OUR FANCY

Underdawgs: How Brad Stevens and the Butler Bulldogs Marched Their Way to the Brink of College Basketball’s National Championship by David Woods

Ratatat

Winter by Marissa Meyer

Bryan’s into file formats.

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Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

The Aesthetic of a Book: Wilson Limited Editions Exhibit

By , November 23, 2015

 

Hiroshima, illustrated by Jacob Lawrence

Hiroshima, illustrated by Jacob Lawrence.

“It is with the reading of books the same as with looking at pictures; one must, without doubt, without hesitations, with assurance, admire what is beautiful.” 

~ Vincent Van Gogh

In case you were visiting the Downtown Library recently and moseyed your way into the first floor art gallery, and happened upon several books from the Wilson Collection and thought, “these books look familiar!” You’d be correct. They are indeed books from the Wilson Limited Editions Collection. Every once in a blue-moon, the amazing collection owned by the Library known as the Wilson Collection gets its own exhibit in a Library art gallery. That time has come again and the title of the exhibit is: The Aesthetic of a Book.

For those of you that haven’t stumbled upon it yet, you are in luck because it’s a pretty diverse and cool exhibit (if I can brag a little). I had a lot of help from my student intern for this semester, Brooke Jackson, and from my supervisor, Liz Coleman. Combined, we collaboratively created an exhibit that displays books and prints ranging from the Bible to Fahrenheit 451. 

The prints chosen from portfolios for the exhibit include:

Music, Deep Rivers in My Soul, illustrated by Dean Mitchell

Music, Deep Rivers in My Soul, illustrated by Dean Mitchell

Music, Deep Rivers in My Soul by Maya Angelou
Artist: Dean Mitchell
Published by the LEC: 2003

A Tribute to Cavafy: Translations by Edmund Keeley & Philip Sherrard
Artist: Duane Michals
Published by the LEC: 2003

Bookmarks in the Pages of Life by Zora Neale Hurston
Artist: Betye Saar
Published by the LEC: 2001

Cosi Fan Tutte by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Artist: Balthus
Published by the LEC: 2001

The Heights of Machu Picchu by Pablo Neruda
Artist: Edward Ranney
Published by the LEC: 1998

Sunrise is Coming After While by Langston Hughes
Artist: Phoebe Beasley
Published by the LEC: 1998

Hiroshima by John Hersey
Artist: Jacob Lawrence
Published by the LEC: 1982

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
Artist: Barry Moser
Published by the Pennyroyal Press: 1982

I don’t want to spoil the books that were chosen however, but I can say the ones chosen include a couple of my favorites, a few old and a few new, and several that exemplify the uniqueness of the collection. Here’s a small sample of a few of the books chosen:

The Pennyroyal Caxton Bible, illustrated by Barry Moser

The Pennyroyal Caxton Bible, illustrated by Barry Moser.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Temple of Flora, illustrated by Jim Dine.

Temple of Flora, illustrated by Jim Dine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Kingdom of this World, illustrated by Roberto Juarez

The Kingdom of This World, illustrated by Roberto Juarez.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


If you’d like to see more, you are going to have to come to the Downtown Library and visit the first floor art gallery. The hours are the same as the library hours. Accompanying the display are several books from the Library’s collection; these books sitting on the window sills are able to be checked out.

Coming soon, the exhibit will include a digital component as well. The touchscreen in the gallery will include more material about the collection. Also, starting in the new year, there will be several b00k-making-related workshops open to anyone to participate. We’ll begin registering for these workshops in the new year. They’re all free and require registration. The classes range from accordion book making to zine making. Check out December’s Off-the-Shelf post to see the full list of workshops. To register for the classes (when registration begins), please call 615-880-2356.

The display in the Wilson room currently matches the first floor gallery exhibit, displaying the books that match the prints (the prints listed above), and a few other specialties.

Other upcoming programs with the collection:

Throwback Thursday with the Wilson Collection –  December 10th in the Teen Area @ Downtown Library, 3:30-5:00

Every month, I bring a few books from the collection back to the Teen area. Teens get a hands-on experience with the books, seeing firsthand what makes these books different from the ones on the shelves. Each program includes a new craft as well that coincides with the month’s theme. December’s theme will be the season/holiday, so come participate in the program and you get to bring home a cool DIY craft!

Here are a few pictures from November’s program:

Thankful books craft           Thankful book crafts

 


If you’re interested in visiting the Wilson Collection, you’ll find it on the 3rd floor of the Downtown Library in the East Reading Room (between the Fine Arts department and Non-Fiction). The hours are the same as the Main Library hours. If you’d like a personal tour of the collection where you’d get to see the books up close and even get to look through them yourself, either respond to this blog post or call either of the following numbers:

(615)880-2363 – leave a message for myself.

(615)880-2356 – leave a message for Liz.

Stay tuned for next month’s post!

Popmatic Podcast for September 16, 2015: Estamos Aquí

By , September 16, 2015


Signs Preceeding the End of the World by Yuri HerreraIt’s Hispanic Heritage Month and that means one thing: four gringos flail awkwardly through a podcast! Just kidding. This year Hispanic Heritage Month at the library is really special. After receiving a grant from the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the library is doing programs about Latino history all year with a ton of community partners. We’re calling it Estamos Aquí: 500 Years of Latino American History. Popmatic gets pumped and tells you all about it. We also tell you what is tickling our fancy this week.

ESTAMOS AQUÍ

Estamos Aquí: 500 Years of Latino American History

Hispanic Heritage Month

Pimps, Hos, Playa Hatas and All the Rest of My Hollywood Friends by John Leguizamo

John Lequizamo: Tales from a Ghetto Klown

the films of Katy Jurado the first Latina nominated for an Academy Award

The Alienist by Machado de Assis with drawings by Carroll Dunham – part of the Wilson Collection

The Alienist by Machado de Assis with drawings by Carroll Dunham

a page from The Alienist by Machado de Assis illustrated by Carroll Dunham

To see The Alienist or the other amazing books in the Wilson Collection contact Sarah Arntz at 615.880.2363 or sarah.arntz@nashville.gov.

Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera translated by Lisa Dillman

TICKLING OUR FANCY

Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live Off the Land by Kurt Timmermeister

Zombies in Pop Culture

White Zombie part of Movies @ Main

The Drop starring Tom Hardy

The Wicked and the Divine issue #14 variant cover by Grimes

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Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

Popmatic Podcast for September 2, 2015: Labor Day

By , September 2, 2015


Baby MamaLet’s get obstetric! Yeah! It’s “labor” day and we went there. Sarah and Jesse guest on this very special episode. Jeremy abuses his time as host to pitch a movie script. Plus—what is tickling our fancy this month.

OUR WATER JUST BROKE

Baby Mama

Taryn Manning in Orange is the New Black

She’s Having a Baby

Parasite Eve by Hideaki Sena

The Filth Child by Doris Lessing

Knocked Up

TICKLING OUR FANCY

Kingsman: The Secret Service

End of the Tour

Passion Pit (CD | Freegal) at Live on the Green

Dave Pilkey at Salon@615

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Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

Popmatic Podcast for April 15th, 2015: Buy Me Some Peanuts

By , April 15, 2015


The Art of Fielding by Chad HarbachThe Nashville Sounds’ first home game in the brand spanking new First Tennessee Stadium is this week. Special guest Sarah joins the Popmatic crew to pass the time with books and movies about America’s favorite pastime. Keep an ear out too for the best local film, comedy, and music festivals happening soon. Tickling Bryan’s Cagian fancy this week is the sound of ice in someone’s water bottle which is featured heavily in the second half of the show.

BASEBALL

Nashville Sounds

adieu Greer Stadium

The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach

Moneyball

Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine starring Avery Brooks as the baseball loving Captain Benjamin Sisko

TICKLING OUR FANCY

Nashville Film Festival

Make It or Break

The Hundred-Foot Journey

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Rites of Spring

Forecastle Festival

Moon Taxi

The Doug Benson Movie Interruption: Footloose

David & Jerry Zucker present AIRPLANE!

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Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

Popmatic Podcast December 10th, 2014: Best Music of the Year

By , December 10, 2014


Future Islands SinglesThese are the tunes that rocked our world in 2014. No joke – there are pirate songs on this list! Arrrr! Luckily, special guest Sarah shows up to save us from Bryan’s terrible picks. Tune in, turn on, check out – its the best music of the year.

BEST MUSIC OF THE YEAR

Amanda’s picks
1) G I R L by Pharrell Williams CD | Freegal
2) Mandatory Fun by Weird Al Yankovic
3) Pulses by Karmin

Bryan’s picks
1) Gay Dog Food by Mykki Blanco
2) Shaken-Up Versions by The Knife
3) Cliff Martinez’ film scores CD/DVD | Freegal | Hoopla

Crystal’s picks
1) Singles by Future Islands
2) Metamodern Sounds in Country Music by Sturgill Simpson CD | Freegal
3) Interstellar by Frankie Rose Freegal | Hoopla

Mike’s picks
1) “Rock Steady” by The Bloody Beetroots
2) 1916 by Motörhead CD | Freegal | Hoopla
3) “Veil of Tears” by Beats Antique Freegal | Hoopla

Sarah’s picks
1) Diamonds by Johnnyswim
2) After the Disco by Broken Bells CD | Freegal
3) Language & Perspective by Bad Suns

TICKLING OUR FANCY

Amanda’s Holiday Concert at Main Library

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Jimmy Page by Jimmy Page

Badmen, Heroes, and Pirate Songs and Ballads by Dick Wilder

Horrible Bosses 2

Voices by Phantogram

Evil Friends by Portugal. The Man

Mikky Ekko

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Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

Book review: Look at Me

By , July 21, 2009

Look at Me
by Jennifer Egan

Charlotte, a thoroughly unpleasant Manhattan model, is back visiting in her small, detested Illinois hometown when she is involved in a catastrophic car accident. Plastic surgery following the wreck leaves her face unscarred but completely unrecognizable. How does a woman who has gotten by her entire life on appearances deal with having her identity taken in an instant?

A mystery man named Z, a tortured private investigator, a plain teenage girl also named Charlotte, a genius/weirdo who is obsessed with the Industrial Revolution and a shady internet project all contribute to that answer in this hard to categorize and equally hard to put down book. Hip and timely, this is a mystery, an edge-of-your-seat thriller, and an engrossing, ironic look at contemporary American culture all at once.

- Sarah

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