Posts tagged: Crafts

Holiday Treats from the Wilson Collection Suite

By , December 28, 2015
Christmas cards from George W. Bush (from Archives) and the Wilson Limited Editions Collection. Christmas Card display can be found in Non-Fiction on 3rd floor of the Main Library.

Christmas cards from George W. Bush (from Archives) and the Wilson Limited Editions Collection. Christmas Card display can be found in Non-Fiction on 3rd floor of the Main Library.

Christmas doesn’t come from a store, maybe Christmas perhaps means a little bit more….

~ Dr. Seuss

Welcome back Wilson readers, and you know what time of year it is. The weather should give an indication but it hasn’t quite caught up with the times though; give it time, it will. If you haven’t caught up as well, it’s the holiday season of course and of all sorts – Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, New Year’s, you name it. In honor of this magical season, I’m going to highlight one of the Wilson Collection’s coolest additions and talk about the fun and easy craft we did during the Throwback Thursday program in Teens.

Let’s get started, shall we….

The Wilson Limited Editions Collection includes 2 copies of Dickens’ holiday classic, A Christmas CarolThe first was published by the Limited Editions Club in 1934, illustrated by artist, Gordon Ross. The second book in the collection was printed by the Arion Press in 1993. While both books embody their own uniqueness and beauty, my personal favorite is the Arion Press edition.

Arion Press published their copy in 1993 to honor the 150th anniversary of its first publication (in 1843). The edition includes an introduction by Paul Davis, a Professor of English Literature at the University of New Mexico. Davis is also a Charles Dickens’ expert. His intro to the book provides a chronicle of the illustrated editions of A Christmas CarolIda Applebroog, a well-known American artist whose works can be found in several popular art museums, created 50 illustrations for the special edition classic. Applebroog created illustrations that pay homage to the earlier versions of the book while also applying her own style.

Along with the anniversary edition, the Press also issued an extra suite of 18 hand-colored prints by Applebroog. When the prints are stood up on their folding stands, it forms a tableau. This special edition was limited to 25 copies and sold with the book, which makes it even more special.

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

The Tableau created by artist, Applebroog, for the Arion Press edition of The Christmas Carol

The Tableau created by artist, Ida Applebroog, for the Arion Press edition of A Christmas Carol.

A few of the illustrations included in the tableau.

A few of the prints included in the tableau.


During December’s Teen program, Throwback Thursday, I took 3 intriguing books from the Wilson Collection:

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
Artist: Ida Applebroog
Arion Press, 1993

A Christmas Carol, published by the Arion Press.

A Christmas Carol, published by the Arion Press.

The Winter’s Tale by William Shakespeare
Artist: Albert Rutherston
Limited Editions Club: 1940

Dec Craft 2015_4

The Winter’s Tale, published by the LEC.

Genesis, translated from the Hebrew by Robert Alter
Artist: Michael Mazur
Arion Press, 1996

Dec Craft 2015_5

Genesis, published by the Arion Press.

Christmas ornament made out of old Christmas cards

Christmas ornament made out of old Christmas cards

I also included a craft for the teens to make ornaments out of Christmas cards. This is an easy and fun craft, especially if you save your cards like I do. All you need to create the ornament is (for 1 ornament):

2-4 Christmas cards (depending on how large you draw your circles)
Ribbon, yarn, or cord (about 1 ft long total)
Scissors
Glue
Pen or pencil
Circular object like a bottle to draw circles

Step 1: On the back of the card fronts, trace 8 circles total (there is no definite size, I drew 1-inch circles and that’s approximately the size you see here).

Step 2: Cut out your circles.

Step 3: Fold each circle in half, creasing the fold well. Then, fold them in half again. They should look like the picture you see below.

Christmas Card Ornament

Step 4: Open each folded circle, cut along just one fold to the middle of the circle (only to the middle).

Step 5: This step can be tedious because you will have to do it to each circle, but it involves the use of the glue. With the circle facing you, place glue on the bottom right section of the circle. Bring the left side of the circle over the right now, and press down to the glue. Your circle should now look like a triangle. Now repeat this step until they are all triangles.

Step 6: This is another repetitive step – but take two triangles and glue them together. They should look like the picture below. Repeat 4 times until all triangles are glued to another.

Christmas Card ornament

Step 7: Now you should see where I am going with this, but let’s glue two of the sections together to create a half-circle.

Step 8: Before gluing the other half to each other, let’s first glue your ribbon or cord to the first half-circle. Glue it half-way down the half-circle for firm placement.

Step 9: Now you may glue the two halves together. Your final product can happily hang on your tree now very easily with it’s ribbon/cord/yarn!

Dec Craft 2015_2

The bottom ornament is the one created with recycled Christmas Cards.


Look forward to next month’s post that will include the schedule for our upcoming book-making workshop programs. I was going to post these programs this month, but it’s better to wait until the new year to finalize all details.

If you’re interested in visiting the Wilson Collection, you’ll find it on the 3rd floor of the Downtown Library in the East Reading Room (between the Fine Arts department and Non-Fiction). The hours are the same as the Main Library hours. If you’d like a personal tour of the collection where you’d get to see the books up close and even get to look through them yourself, either respond to this blog post or call either of the following numbers:

(615)880-2363 – leave a message for myself.

(615)880-2356 – leave a message for Liz.

Stay tuned for next month’s post!

Express Yourself: Activism through Zines

By , July 24, 2015

Girls to Grrlz coverBECAUSE us girls crave records and books and fanzines that speak to US that WE feel included in and can understand in our own ways. – Excerpt from the original Riot Grrrl Manifesto

*     *     *

The concept of the zine dates back to the 1930s when science-fiction fans started producing do-it-yourself magazines containing news, reviews, and tributes to the latest sci-fi and fantasy literature. These small-run publications were called fanzines.

Eventually the idea spread to other genres and areas of interest, including what was to become known as the Riot Grrrl Movement. The term “Riot Grrrl” was coined by punk bands Bikini Kill and Bratmobile with Bratmobile members Allison Wolte and Molly Neuman releasing the first Riot Grrrl zine in 1991.

In Make Your Own History: Documenting Feminist & Queer Activism in the 21st Century, Jenna Freedman notes that “punk rock and riot grrrl community ethos are fundamental to zines, not just as the cultures that birthed them…but also as what separates them from other self-publications,” continuing on to say “that zine producers are not only people who have been relegated to the margins but also people who have chosen to claim the margins.”

The Riot Grrrl movement, for example, empowered young women to speak up against sexism and as author Trina Robbins explains, “one of the first Riot Grrrl actions was to protest violence in a traditionally feminist collective way, by reclaiming the mosh pit, that crushing and frightening all-male area in front of the band at concerts. To make a space for themselves, the girls formed packs and forced their way to the front en masse, each protecting the other.”

Today, many communities use zines as a form of self-expression and activism. Check out the POC Zine Project and the Queer Zine Archive Project online. Locally you can explore the Watkins Zine Library and the Brainfreeze Comics & Zines shelf in The Groove. And if you’re up for a road trip, the Fales Library Special Collections at NYU houses The Riot Grrrl Collection.

Inspired to tell your own story? Make a Tiny Zine!

Materials:

  • 1 letter size (8.5 x 11) sheet of paper
  • Markers, scissors, glue, old magazines, scrap paper, etc.

Instructions:

  1. Construct – Fold and cut paper to make a book (see infographic below).
  2. Personalize – Write, draw, paint, cut, glue, and decorate your zine.
  3. Distribute – Make photocopies and share / trade with friends and family!

Make a Tiny Zine Infographic

Histories & How-tos:
Don’t Need You: The Herstory of Riot Grrrl
Ephemeral Material: Queering the Archive
From Girls to Grrrlz: A History of Comics from Teens to Zines
Make a Zine!
Make Your Own History: Documenting Feminist & Queer Activism in the 21st Century
Stolen Sharpie Revolution: A DIY Zine Resource

Cracking Codes: DIY Morse Code Jewelry

By , March 21, 2015

Spy Hunters Find Clews in Secret CodesImages, symbols, codes, and ciphers have been used to communicate information secretly for thousands of years.  The June 1938 issue of Popular Science includes several examples in the article, “Spy Hunters Find Clews in Secret Codes.”  There’s a transposition wheel in which music notes replace letters and even a stitched version of Morse code, for instance.

In our Nashville Reads story, Between Shades of Gray, the main character, Lina, includes information about her location in artwork that she passes along in hopes of reaching her father, as she and her family are being deported to work camps in Siberia. Our Nashville Reads program, Codes, Ciphers, & Secret Messages, will explore how codes, hidden messages, and ciphers have been used in history while kids crack codes and create their own secret messages.

Make Morse code jewelry with the Special Collections Division at Bordeaux on March 26 from 2:00-3:00pm or at Bellevue on April 15 from 4:00-5:00pm. Can’t make it out to a branch? Participate in the city-wide read from the comfort of your own home with this simple tutorial on making a Morse code necklace or bracelet.

Materials:

Instructions:

  1. Choose 3 different colors of beads.
  2. Use the Morse Code Translator to create the letters in your name using 2 of the colors. Color #1 will represent the dots and Color #2 will represent the dashes.
  3. Insert a bead of Color #3 in between each letter. This color will serve as a space.
  4. String the beads to create a necklace or bracelet and VOILA!

Morse Code Picture Tutorial

 

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