Category: Movies

Upcoming Movies from YA Books

By , April 7, 2015

Insurgent_poster Insurgent is based on the book by Veronica Roth Now out in theaters, Insurgent is attracting droves of fans, eager for the next installment in Triss’s quest for the truth. Reviews have been discouraging, and there are some significant changes from Roth’s book. Nevertheless, box office sales are through the roof.

 

 

 

 

Paper Towns Paper Towns  is based on the book by John Green The thing to know about this movie is that it is not TFiOS. True, there is a girl, Margo, played by Cara Delevingne. She’s fierce, beautiful, and utterly fascinating to the boy next door, Quentin. Quentin is played by Nat Wolff, who fans will remember from the movie TFIOS, although he wore sunglasses for much of the movie. Due out July, 2015.

 

 

 

 

Fallen is the first book in a series by Lauren Kate. Addison Timlin stars as Luce Price, who has been sent to the Sword & Cross boarding school in Savannah. Jeremy Irvine plays opposite her as the elusive Daniel Grigori. Also due for release in July, 2015.

 

 

 

 

The Scorch Trials is the second in James Dashner’s Maze Runner series. The big mystery of the Glade was answered at the end of the first movie…kind of. Now there’s more action as the Gladers confront a new situation and what it means for them. Look for this one in September, 2015.

 

 

 

Fifth Wave The Fifth Wave  is based on the book by Rick Yancey In Yancey’s thrilling novel, aliens have invaded Earth, leaving a bleak land that has been compared to the setting of Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadChloe Grace Moretz is lined up to play Cassie Sullivan, who lives by one rule: “Trust No One.” Projected release date: January, 2016.

 

 

 

ASA peregrine

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiars is based on the book with a similar title by Ransom Riggs. Tim Burton will be directing a cast of adorably peculiar children, headed by Asa Butterfield,  who plays Jacob Portman. Currently in production, the release date is set for March 2016.

 

 

 

 

Daughter of Smoke and Bone reportedly has a screen play written by author Laini Taylor. This one has been has been in the works for a while, with Michael Gracey set to direct. No news on casting or release date.

 

 

 

 

 

Grasshopper Jungle  is based on the Printz Honor Award-winning novel by Andrew Smith. Edgar Wright is set to direct this one – eventually. Aside from the heartwarming story of how Facebook brought Grasshopper Jungle to Wright’s attention, not much has come to pass. Should be worth the wait!

 

 

 

 

Diane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Movie review: Crafting a Nation One Craft Beer at a Time

By , March 30, 2015

bookcoverIE2652RI Crafting a Nation One Craft Beer at a Time

I really enjoyed this well shot documentary featuring several craft beer operations in cities like Denver,  Asheville and Saint Louis (in the shadow of Anheuser Busch, no less) as well as other locations in California, Texas, Minnesota and Delaware. It’s a visually appealing film, informative and sometimes down right inspirational – the entrepreneurial/American Dream in action!

The Asheville breweries (and there are many!) emphasize relying on using home grown ingredients and sources like the French Broad River, resulting in some wonderful, unique and seasonal brews. Of course, microbreweries have really proliferated over the last decade or so but it was noted that American consumers still go for the major brands and the little guys cut and scrape for about 5% of the market share.  But what an interesting and unique segment that is!

Also well depicted is the spirit, hard work and commitment shown by these brewers, often expanded family run operations.  The nervous run up to the opening of the Black Shirt Brewery  in Denver was particularly memorable after so much work (getting  codes approval, piping issues, construction work). It was also interesting to hear occasional commentary from the owner of one of the pioneering microbreweries – Anchor Steam in San Francisco as well as insights from Moonlight’s Brian Hunt.  The film does jump around a bit but it’s all good and worth watching for sure.

So next time you mix up a pack of unique beers at Kroger or down your favorite ale at Blackstone’s,  give a cheer to the dedicated, passionate folks who worked so hard to make it happen for us lucky consumers!

-Phil

 

Legends of Film: Peter Medak

By , March 28, 2015


The Hunchback of Notre Dame - movie posterDuring this episode of Legends of Film we talk to director Peter Medak. Mr. Medak’s film credits include The Ruling Class, The Krays, and the upcoming Movies @ Main feature The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Medak discusses working with notable actors such as Glenda Jackson and Helen Mirren, his experience directing episodes of two critically acclaimed TV series: Hannibal and Breaking Bad, and finally, his justification for making another film adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

See The Hunchback of Notre Dame on Saturday April 11, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. at the Nashville Public Library, downtown.

Subscribe to Legends of Film podcast (feedburner).

Legends of Film: Steve Carver

By , February 21, 2015


Lone_wolf_mcquadeDuring this episode of Legends of Film we talk to director Steve Carver. Carver’s film credits include Big Bad Mama, Capone, and the upcoming Movies @ Main feature, Lone Wolf McQuade. Mr. Carver discusses working with the legendary filmmaker Roger Corman, and explains why it’s NOT a good idea to take over a film from another director.

See Lone Wolf Mcquade on Saturday March 14,2015 at 2:00 p.m. at Nashville Public Library, downtown.

Subscribe to Legends of Film podcast (feedburner).

Nashville & Selma

By , February 9, 2015

Poster for movie Selma

Watching the new movie Selma was like seeing Nashville’s Civil Rights “All Stars”: James Bevel, Diane Nash, C.T. Vivian, John Lewis, Bernard LaFayette are all depicted in the film.

To be sure, the Nashville movement was much larger than these five people. Many others who gained national prominence in the Civil Rights Movement also got their start in Nashville. But they couldn’t have done it alone. Countless ordinary “foot soldiers” – like the mass of marchers in Selma – took part in the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins in 1960, often enduring beatings, arrests, and insults.

 

James Bevel in1960, at a protest in Nashville

James Bevel at a protest in Nashville, March 1960

 

What you may not have known – and what is not shown in the film – is that former Nashville activist, James Bevel, first proposed the Selma-to-Montgomery march. Prompted by the cold indifference of Alabama governor George Wallace to the killing of Jimmie Lee Jackson by state troopers, Bevel said:

“I’m going to go and talk to Wallace, and I’m going to walk all the way from Selma to Montgomery, because I want to think about what I want to say to him…. How many people you think … [will] walk with me?”

Listen to this excerpt of an oral history interview with Bernard LaFayette, where he tells more about Bevel’s role in initiating the march.

 

LaFayette on Bevel and Selma march

LaFayette on Bevel and Selma march

 

The Nashvillians portayed in Selma could march forward without fear, because they had already endured so much. They were, in the strongest sense of the word, veterans. In 1961, when some of them – including Diane Nash and John Lewis – left Nashville for Alabama to ensure that the Freedom Rides continued, they quite consciously knew they were risking death. These courageous men and women, most of them in their early twenties, made sure they had made out their wills before leaving town.

Now, it was four years later, and the Civil Rights campaign had focused on Selma. People who had gotten their training in non-violent protest in Nashville during the sit-ins were again at the forefront, and they were still risking their lives.

Learn more:

Books:

The Children by David Halberstam (tells the story of the Nashville sit-ins)

Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice by Raymond Arsenault

In Peace and Freedom: My Journey in Selma by Bernard LaFayette [Library Use Only]

Cradle of Freedom: Alabama and the Movement That Changed America by Frye Gaillard [Library Use Only]

Documentaries:

Nashville: We Were Warriors [available for individual viewing in the Main Library's Civil Rights Room]

Freedom Riders

4 Little Girls [Library Use Only]

Selma the City and the Symbol [Library Use Only]

Home of the Brave [Library Use Only]

Primary sources at Nashville Public Library:

Civil Rights Oral History Project

Civil Rights Collection

Civil Rights topics in our Digital Collections 

– Linda

Movie Review: A Million Ways to Die in the West

By , January 27, 2015

A Million Ways to Die in the West

Sometimes you just need a movie that will make you laugh. Sometimes you want to see Adam Sandler get in a fist fight with Bob Barker or Will Ferrell run around a Nascar track in his underwear. If you wholeheartedly agreed and want go watch one of these right now - you definitely need to see this movie. (If you ran screaming from the room at the mere mention of Adam Sandler – you might want to skip this one. But you don’t know what you’re missing…)

Written and directed by Seth MacFarlane – the guy who brought us Family Guy and TedA Million Ways to Die in the West takes MacFarlane’s trademark irreverence and moves it to where it belongs: The Wild West. The West was a rough place to live. If the Indians didn’t get you, the wild animals would. So many ways to die, so little time.

Seth MacFarlane plays Albert – a local sheep farmer who’s in love with Amanda Seyfried’s Louise. Unfortunately, she’s in love with the local mustache purveyor Foy (NPH himself). Will he get her back or will Charlize Theron have to climb down from her gold Dior tower to save the day? There were parts that were laugh out loud funny and parts that were scream out loud shocking. This movie is not for the faint of heart. My favorite character was Sarah Silverman’s “Lady of the Evening.”

Two notes of caution:

1) Even if he begs for it, DO NOT lend Neil Patrick Harris your hat. You won’t want it back when he’s done.
2) People die at the fair.

Happy watching…

:) Amanda

PS Does anyone else think Seth MacFarlane looks like Peter Brady? Just wondering…

  

Sound City

By , January 18, 2015

SoundCityThis gem can be found on Hoopla and is certainly worth watching. If you read the recent Rolling Stone cover story  (December 4, 2014 – available via Zinio!) on Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters (and of course, former Nirvana member) you know he’s an intensely busy guy and that he loves the history and uniqueness of American recording studios.

Grohl produced and directed this full length documentary on the Van Nuys, California landmark, Sound City in 2013. It will have to hold me over until I can view, somehow, Sonic Highways, the eight part HBO music studio/city travelogue series he recently completed.

Sound City Studios and its legendary Neve sound mixing console saw numerous excellent bands and recordings throughout the seventies and into the nineties (a modern highpoint being Nirvana’s Nevermind) and beyond until the digital age/Pro Tools and other changes affected it’s ultimate demise in 2011. From Fleetwood Mac’s Rumors, Neil Young’s After the Gold Rush, Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers’ Damn the Torpedos, Hard Promises (and others) to  recordings by Rick Springfield (you’ll learn more about his famous dog too), War, Cheap Trick, Johnny Cash and many others this place reveled in a no frills / do it live ethos that resulted in some truly solid recordings. Was it the room dynamics that lead to the terrific and much sought after drum sound? Or a combination of magic and luck…

The film is a flowing trip of first hand recollections, great footage, interviews with musicians and those that worked there or helped make the recordings – Butch Vig, Ric Reuben among them along with Grohl’s own animated appearances. Find out what eventually happened to the legendary sound board, see Stevie Nicks laying down vocals with the Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney jamming on what appears to be an electric cigar box guitar! Great stuff.

-Phil

Sound City

Popmatic Podcast December 17th, 2014: Best Movies of the Year

By , December 17, 2014


Your holds queue just gained a few holiday pounds. These are best movies of the year. Could Bryan’s favorite movie of the year be Amanda’s least favorite of the year? You’ll have to listen to find out. Tell us your favorites in the comments.

BEST MOVIES OF THE YEAR

Amanda
The Lego Movie1) The Lego Movie
2) Veronica Mars
3) Frozen
 
 
 
 
 

Bill
Chef1) Chef
2) A Most Wanted Man
3) Nightcrawler
 
 
 
 
 

Bryan
Maleficent1) Maleficent
2) The Congress
3) Jodorowsky’s Dune
 
 
 
 
 

Jeremy
We are the Best1) We Are the Best
2) Snowpiercer
3) Obvious Child
 
 
 
 
 

Mike
Grand Budapest Hotel1) The Grand Budapest Hotel
2) Under the Skin
3) Blue Ruin
 
 
 
 
 

TICKLING OUR FANCY

Brief Encounters: Conversations, Magic Moments, and Assorted Hijinks by Dick Cavett

Text Me Merry Christmas” by Kristen Bell & Straight No Chaser

Holiday Wishes by Idina Menzel

Amanda’s holiday concert

Letterboxd – like GoodReads but for movies

Cutie and the Boxer

The Taking of Pelham One Two Three original 1974 version

Brick

Her

Birdman

Cat People

Captain American: Winter Soldier

Guardians of the Galaxy

A Field in England

-

Transcripts of the show are available upon request.

Book review: A Christmas Memory

By , December 11, 2014

capoteA Christmas Memory

By Truman Capote

 

 

When writer Truman Capote was a little boy, he lived for some years with his eccentric aunt, Miss Sook in rural Alabama. Truman considered Miss Sook to be his very best friend and this book was inspired by their time together. A Christmas Memory centers around one of Miss Sook’s favorite Christmas activities, making fruitcakes. High jinks ensue when Truman and Miss Sook set out to make 30 cakes in time for Christmas. A Christmas Memory is a warmhearted and charming tale that celebrates love and simple blessings.

 

 

-Karen

 

 

P.S.       A Christmas Memory is available as a short story for adults, as a picture book for children and on DVD. You can read more about the adventures of Truman and Miss Sook in Capote’s short story collection entitled A Christmas Memory, One Christmas and The Thanksgiving Visitor.

 

 

 

 

 

DVD review: Chef

By , December 9, 2014

Chef

I have a secret guilty pleasure. I will watch any movie with John Leguizamo in it. From the Summer of Sam to Romeo + Juliet, Ice Age to ER, I always love his characters. They’re funny and smart and he usually leaves you wanting more.

So when I saw that he as going to be in a new movie, I was intrigued. And the fact that it was about a food truck? That just made it so much the better.

Jon Favreau actually wrote, directed, and starred in this movie. Favreau is the main chef at a struggling restaurant, who is not being allowed to explore his creative food talents by square boss Dustin Hoffman. Leguizamo is his sous chef and friend. After flipping out at a food blogger (played by the great Oliver Platt) in a video that goes ultraviral online, Favreau walks away from his head chef job in order to find his culinary voice.

While on a trip to Miami with his ex-wife and son to talk to his ex-wife’s ex-husband played by a manic Robert Downey, Jr. (did you follow that?), Favreau finds himself in possession of a run-down old food truck that he has no idea what to do with. With the assitance of his son and Leguizamo, who flies from California to Miami to work on the food truck with his old boss and friend, Favreau starts the road trip of a lifetime – selling Cuban sandwiches along the way as they drive El Jefe Cubanos from Miami to California.

I liked the aspects of the movie that were about the food truck, but the story had a lot of heart and a lot of humor. As one could expect, the life of a chef offers very little time for a solid family life, and the road trip was as much about building the relationship between father and son as it was about rebuilding a career.

My husband didn’t really want to watch this with me because I’ve made him watch the Food Network all the time, but he even admitted that it was a good movie. If you are looking for a good story, feel free to start here.

But I warn you, you will want a yummy Cuban sandwich afterwards. I’m just saying…

Happy watching…

Amanda :)

 

 

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