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Synopsis

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Book One spans John Lewis’ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.

Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.” Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

About John Lewis

John Lewis

John Lewis is the U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 5th district and an American icon known for his role in the civil rights movement.

He first joined the movement as a seminary student in Nashville, organizing sit-ins and participating in the first Freedom Rides, which challenged illegal segregation at bus stations across the South. He soon became the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and one of the “Big Six” national leaders of the movement, alongside such figures as Martin Luther King, Jr. and A. Philip Randolph. As SNCC chairman, Lewis was an architect of, and the youngest featured speaker at, the historic 1963 March on Washington, and was a key figure in the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer. Together with Hosea Williams, he led the landmark “Bloody Sunday” March in Selma, Alabama, where police brutality spurred national outrage and hastened passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Despite physical attacks, serious injuries, and more than 40 arrests, John Lewis has remained a devoted advocate of the philosophy of nonviolence. His subsequent career has included voter registration activism, service on the Atlanta City Council, and over 25 years in Congress. Lewis was awarded the Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama in 2011, and was the first recipient of the John F. Kennedy “Profile in Courage” Lifetime Achievement Award.

Now, in collaboration with Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, he has created March, a #1 New York Times Bestselling series of graphic novels. March has become a runaway success with institutions and individuals, who have celebrated the series even at Comic-Con, where Congressman Lewis dressed in costume as himself and led a crowd of students in a commemorative march. Perhaps most importantly, schools and universities nationwide have embraced the project, making John Lewis’s story a must-read for young people across America.

Accolades

March: Book One

  • Coretta Scott King Honor Book
  • Robert F. Kennedy Book Award — Special Recognition

March: Book Two

  • Eisner Award for Best Reality-Based Work

March: Book Three

  • Coretta Scott King Author Award
  • National Book Award for Young People’s Literature
  • Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Literature Written for Young Adults
  • YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults